Travel & Adventure

Unique Traditions In Japan That Make You Want To Visit The Country

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Unique Traditions In Japan That Make You Want To Visit The Country

Japan is one of the busiest and most visited countries in the world. One of the main reasons why people love to visit this country is because of unique culture Japanese people have. Even though they are known to be one of the most advanced countries, the people living in Japan don’t forget their origin, culture, and traditions. They embrace them all in their daily lives even with how modern the world has become. 

Japanese unique traditions to learn more about during your visit

Japan has such a remarkable and rich culture with deep historical background. If you plan on visiting this country, here are unique traditions Japan you might want to know about:

Kutsuwonugu

This is a unique Japanese tradition of taking off shoes. In Japan, you don’t wear outside shoes inside. They consider it as rude and unclean if you do it instead. The Japanese people believe that the outside is dirty and the inside is clean. Hence, wearing outside shoes inside can transfer something dirty. Hence, you need to take off your shoes upon entering someone’s house or place when visit the country. You can leave your shoes on the little porch available in every house in Japan. You will be provided house slipper by the hosts to wear inside the house. 

Hanami 

Hanami

Hanami is a Japanese tradition of flower viewing. The flowers the Japanese people adore the most is Sakura. It is unofficial flower of the country which usually blooms between mid-March and early May. The Japanese love to celebrate this occasion and they have been doing it for centuries as part of their culture. Families and friends gather around under the trees to admire blooming Sakura up close. The flower itself symbolizes hope and new beginnings. 

Bowing

In Japan and some of Asian countries, bowing is part of the culture. Japanese people greet each other by bowing and  the bow itself can be varied. It can be a simple nod of the head to a complete bend of the upper body. To greet a friend, they give slight bows since it is considered casual encounter. As for showing respects, saying thanks, apologizing, or making a request, people give a deep full bow. 

Kurisumasu ni wa Kentakki

This is a tradition Japanese people have been doing to celebrate the merriness of Christmas. They love to visit KFC and order some chicken to celebrate Christmas since turkeys are very rare to find in the country. The KFC Christmas buckets are not your usual fried-chickens. Instead, it is a package full of meals filled with whole-roasted chicken including sides, wine, and cake. 

Hatsuhinode

This is a Japanese tradition to celebrate the first sunrise of the year. It is when Japanese families wake up to see the first sunrise of the year. They usually head to a shrine, mountaintop, or a beach to watch the first sunrise. The tradition of watching the first sunrise is considered a good luck of the year for Japanese people. They wish and pray for the year ahead to be full of luck.